Tag Archives: sketches

How You Know You Have a Great Mom (…and a kitty gif)

Kitty Wrinkles

A kitty playing with bed sheets, for your viewing pleasure. And now…on with the blog post.

A moment when my mother revealed what kind of a mother she is.

Bicycles and Suitcases Do Not Mix

Earlier this week I stayed the night at my parents’ house while traveling nearby for a doctor’s appointment.

I traveled primarily on bicycle.

Suitcases and bicycles do not mix.

All that I could bring, therefore, was what would fit in my backpack. Continue reading

How I spent the last 7 hours of my life spraying down my computer with bleach

You’d think I’d know better by now. But nope, true story.

1. I’ve got this great idea for a post!

Excited Guy Meme

Hey, I’ve got some interesting information I’d like to post. There’s this thing happening right now on the web and I can record it with some screen-capture software. Then I’ll make a meme out of it and post it on the web. It’ll be great! Everyone will share it and I’ll have contributed to the gentrification of The Internet.

2. Gotta get that screen-recording software running

Work Hard meme

So, I’ll need to install some software to make this thing. What was the name of that software I used years and years ago? Camtasia? Is that it? Ahh, yeah. It worked great back then. Let’s install it.

3. Hmm, could something be wrong with this installation? Nahhh.

When You Go Too Fast meme

Hmm, last time I was installing this I don’t remember the software asking me over and over again if I “AGREE” to installing this stuff. Doesn’t it just have to ask me “once” if I agree?

Oh well. I’ve used this stuff before and it worked great, so let’s keep moving.

Intermission

Titanic meets Michael Bay explosions meme

4. I’ve made a terrible mistake

computer virus meme

…Why is my computer now flooding with biki babes and product suggestions? Shouldn’t it be recording?

It couldn’t be that I…a comfortable computer user…who even knows a little bit of Javascript and CSS…it couldn’t be that anyone such as me…so smart as I am…could…dang…

5. Sttaahhhhhp! Please!

Madly Typing Cat meme

5. The only solution

Burning Computer meme

And we’ll purge this part of my hard drive…and this part…and this part…. Minor detour. Should only take…oh…all night or so to fix.

Hours and hours later…

6. Good to go again…

Semi Missing a Wheel on the highway meme

There we go. I just had to run eighteen full-system scans, download three types of malware removal, and spend $60 on software. There’s only a few programs that are permanently uninstallable, due to problems with the computer registry, and I can still access most of my documents folder. That’ll do. So, let’s write that blog post…

7. Meanwhile…deep within the belly of my computer…

Evil Witch Hiding meme…I won’t be up all night thinking about what might still be lurking in the belly of my desktop beast…really, I won’t…

 

Finalized Silhouette - Shapes in Storytelling

Shapes in Storytelling

Remember that Deep Sea RV Trailer?

Yesterday you saw the drawing of the man moseying along through the depths of the ocean via his deep-sea RV trailer.

The fun thing is that, if you’ve been following along with my class posts, now you know how I did the drawing. Let me put it all together for you…

Shapes in Storytelling

One thing I love about working with a silhouette from the outset is that it gives me an opportunity to focus on the two most important aspects right off: the underlying concept and the overall design.

Shapes in Storytelling

Brainstorming with silhouettes

The idea at the beginning was to create an underwater place to live—I chose a cottage.

For a couple of hours I just sketched up dozens of ideas. Most of the sketches were downright failures, but a few were worth exploring.

Somewhere along the lines I got hooked on the idea of having the underwater cottage be mobile.

And then I liked the idea of having it pulled by a school of jelly fish. Why not?

 

Developing the idea

Of course, any self-respecting underwater mobile cottage must have a bubbling chimney on its back.

Shapes in Storytelling

Bubbling underwater chimney

 

And it also must be driven by a pleasant cheeky old man.

Shapes in Storytelling

Sketches for the driver – Deep Sea RV Trailer

Here’s our final silhouette:

Finalized Silhouette - Shapes in Storytelling

Final Silhouette – Deep Sea RV Trailer

 

W.O.T.s

Just like we did with the Shapely Plants, it’s time to put some white on top of those black silhouettes, and see if we can’t further develop the shape.

In my UVU class we’ve taken to calling these drawings “WOTs,” short for “white-on-tops.”

Shapes in Storytelling

WOTs for our Deep Sea RV Trailer – click for a larger view

 

Final words

Come travel with me in the deep blue sea

Final Ink Drawing – Deep Sea RV Trailer

 

From the WOTs image higher up above in the post, I chose the WOT on the lower left. Take a look here and see if you can find the few changes I made between the WOT and the final.

What do you think—is there one of those other WOTs that you also would like to have seen? And what are your thoughts in general? Let me know in the comments!

Using abstract shapes to design plants

Shapely Plants

What to do with those emotional shapes?

Now that we’re telling stories with nothing but shapes, how do we use it in design?

In my UVU concept art class what we did next was to create eight new abstract shapes that we really like, purely in the design sense.

Abstract Shapes - by Bryan Beus

Abstract Shapes

We took those eight shapes and mixed them together to create two different plants.

From the outset we understood that the plants would be nonsensical—that was part of the fun.

But, as you see when you look through the next few pictures, we didn’t just stop there.

Once we had those plants designed, we used them as a base for drawing more designs within the black silhouettes—this time with a white pen drawn over the black.

This is a way for artists to plan out the smaller shapes that reside within the design.

Take a look below, see if you can pick out the building-block shapes above with the final results.

Using abstract shapes to design plants

Using abstract shapes to design plants
Bryan Beus

Shapely Plants

Using abstract shapes to design plants
Bryan Beus

Using abstract shapes to design plants

Using abstract shapes to design plants
Bryan Beus

Using abstract shapes to design plants

Using abstract shapes to design plants
Bryan Beus

 

And, as promised, here are the answers from the last blog post:

1 & 2: Centered

3 & 4: Vigorous

5: Bored

6 & 7: Vulnerable

8 & 9: Hatred

10 & 11: Panic

12: Tormented

 

How did you do? Let me know in the comments section how close I came to capturing those emotions for you.

Bryan Beus - Abstract Emotions

Abstract Emotional Shapes

Abstract emotional shapes from my UVU Concept Art Class.

All in all, this is a really fun activity.

This assignment I thought up as an opportunity to use shapes—in their purest sense—to create emotion and stories. Shapes are the building blocks of all solid design, so by cutting out the narrative element of shapes—that is, not worrying about making the shapes resemble anything we might recognize—it’s easier to focus on just making stuff that’s neat, no matter the context.

We started with a list of a dozens of different human emotions—such as pain, fear, melancholy, etc.—and then together we came up with shapes that we felt described those emotions.

We all brought these emotional shapes to class to show to each other, and everyone made guesses as to which emotion each shape was supposed to evoke. If everyone guessed the correct emotion, then the creator of the shape knew s/he was on the right track.

Here are a few from my attempts from the first pass at this exercise.

Can you guess the emotions? Let me know what you think in the comments.

(I’ll post the answers with my next blog post)

1:

Bryan Beus - Abstract Emotions

Bryan Beus – Abstract Emotions
www.bryanbeus.com

 

2:

Bryan Beus - Abstract Emotions

Bryan Beus – Abstract Emotions
www.bryanbeus.com

 

3:

Bryan Beus - Abstract Emotions

Bryan Beus – Abstract Emotions
www.bryanbeus.com

 

4:

Bryan Beus - Abstract Emotions

Bryan Beus – Abstract Emotions
www.bryanbeus.com

 

5:

Bryan Beus - Abstract Emotions

Bryan Beus – Abstract Emotions
www.bryanbeus.com

 

6:

Bryan Beus - Abstract Emotions

Bryan Beus – Abstract Emotions
www.bryanbeus.com

 

7:

Bryan Beus - Abstract Emotions

Bryan Beus – Abstract Emotions
www.bryanbeus.com

 

8:

Bryan Beus - Abstract Emotions

Bryan Beus – Abstract Emotions
www.bryanbeus.com

 

9:

Bryan Beus - Abstract Emotions

Bryan Beus – Abstract Emotions
www.bryanbeus.com

 

10:

Bryan Beus - Abstract Emotions

Bryan Beus – Abstract Emotions
www.bryanbeus.com

 

11:

Bryan Beus - Abstract Emotions

Bryan Beus – Abstract Emotions
www.bryanbeus.com

 

12:

Bryan Beus - Abstract Emotions

Bryan Beus – Abstract Emotions
www.bryanbeus.com

Rock and Cloud Silhouettes - by Bryan Beus

Rock and Cloud Silhouettes

How hard is it to create rock and cloud silhouettes that are fun and interesting?

I’m teaching a class on conceptual art at Utah Valley University right now (and teaching is one of the most fun things I’ve ever done!)

Because the assignments I’m giving the students are so much fun, I couldn’t miss out on all the action. So, here’s one of the assignments that I did along with them.

The task is is ultra simple: create silhouettes of ultra simple objects—in this case, rocks and clouds—in such a way as to make them interesting.

Working with these rock and cloud silhouettes challenges the artist to tell a story with rudimentary shapes.

At the end, we then picked a couple of the silhouettes and turned them into full drawings.

Here are some of my exercises. (Maybe, towards the end of the semester, I’ll ask my students if it’s okay to post a few of their assignments on my blog.)

 

Rock Silhouettes - by Bryan Beus

Rock Silhouettes – by Bryan Beus

 

Rock Silhouettes - by Bryan Beus

Rock Silhouettes – by Bryan Beus

 

Rock Silhouettes - by Bryan Beus

Rock Silhouettes – by Bryan Beus

 

Rock Silhouettes - by Bryan Beus

Rock Silhouettes – by Bryan Beus

 

Cloud Silhouettes - by Bryan Beus

Cloud Silhouettes – by Bryan Beus

 

Cloud Silhouettes - by Bryan Beus

Cloud Silhouettes – by Bryan Beus

 

Rock Drawing - by Bryan Beus

Rock Drawing – by Bryan Beus

 

Rock Drawing - by Bryan Beus

Rock Drawing – by Bryan Beus

From Nausicaa of the Valley of The Wind Rises

Salt Lake Comic Con – 2014

From Nausicaa of the Valley of The Wind Rises: Why We Love Hayao Miyazaki

Salt Lake Comic Con 2014 was great. My favorite panel on which I spoke was, “From Nausicaa of the Valley of The Wind Rises: Why We Love Hayao Miyazaki.”

A little back story to my reason for being on this panel…

When I was fifteen my friends and I randomly heard about this animated film from a great Japanese director. The film was playing only in “select theaters,” which meant we would have to leave our small town and travel to the big city.

(…a.k.a. Salt Lake City—it was huge in our heads, okay? 😉

For restless teenagers, going to see this film was more a reason to get out from under the authority of our parents than anything.

We arrived at the theater long after dark, finding our seats not long before the movie screen filled with a painted background of a misty forest and a deep voice began,

 

“In ancient times,

the land lay covered in forests,

 

where, from ages long past,

dwelt the spirits of the gods.

 

Back then, man and beast lived in harmony,

but as time went by, most of the great forests were destroyed.

 

Those that remained were guarded by gigantic beasts…

who owed their allegiance to the Great Forest Spirit,

 

…for those were the days of gods and demons.”

 

I don’t know at what point during the film I felt my life changing forever. All I know is that from the moment the film ended, I was forever obsessed with visual storytelling. (To be fair, there were three other pieces of art I saw that moved me into becoming a visual storyteller for a living, but, as far as I can remember, Hayao Miyazaki was the first one with whom I became obsessed.)

 

Trailer for Princess Mononoke

 

Fast forward seventeen years and I have great things in the works for next fall…(hint hint).

Miyazaki has been a constant source of inspiration throughout my life, and when the panel schedulers for Salt Lake Comic Con asked me about which panels I wanted to attend as a speaker, Miyazaki’s was one of the first I chose.

It was SUCH an honor to sit in that room speaking with other fans. The room was packed to the last row. There were a few attendees even dressed as Miyazaki characters.

Anyone could see that there were many people in the audience who knew at least as much as I do about Miyazaki films (and that is seriously saying something). And throughout the event I simply felt lucky and bewildered to be the one with the microphone, sharing my experiences, and hoping that what I was saying was somehow worth their time!

Great, great experience.

Oh, and by the way, Miyazaki’s first film, Lupin III: The Castle of Cagliostro, is streaming right now free on Hulu. Check it out!

There are many rumors that when Steven Spielberg saw this film at its release at Cannes Film Festival way back in the 80’s, Spielberg called it, “…one of the greatest adventure films of all time.” And, apparently, he also said that the car chase scene (after the intro credits) is one of the best of its kind.

Give it 20 minutes or so, as the style is very, very old.

 

Farmer’s Market

Still drawin’ away at the Provo Farmer’s Market on Saturdays. I’m getting the hang of things, and also continually finding new ways to improve. The price is $10 per face (quite affordable, considering what you’ll pay elsewhere). Do come and take a seat!

If you are interested and don’t want to come all the way to the market only to find that the line is too long, come in the morning. People usually don’t want to commit to anything until awhile after the market starts (the market opens at 10, but I’m usually free until 11). So, I often end up just sketching in my sketchbook for the first hour or so, and then all of a sudden I have a line that lasts for up to an hour and a half after the market is over. Come early, and you’ll be sure to get a seat.

Recent fun with a charming young chap by the name of Luke.

Ink Portrait of Luke - by Bryan Beus

Ink Portrait of Luke – by Bryan Beus

Ink Portrait of Luke - by Bryan Beus

Ink Portrait of Luke – by Bryan Beus

No. 9: Heaven Surfing

Heaven Surfing, by Bryan Beus

Heaven Surfing, by Bryan Beus

No. 9: Heaven Surfing

Part of the series, 100 Vines in 100 Days

Posted on Vine here: http://vncl.co/wa4sMK2WXtb

UPDATE:

So, remember how a while ago I said that I might have some big news? And I was just holding my breath on posting any details about the whereabouts of the stories on my table until I was sure?

Well, that news has come true!

I will let you know what it is real soon.

In the meantime, this big news is going to put this “100 Vines in 100 Days” on hold. There are still 91 days left, and we’re right on track. I should be back on this come November.

More to come!